Posts Tagged With: ice cream

Scouting Locations in Rainy Paris

Today is more location scouting.   Work, work, work…  🙂  Well, not really work when it’s in one of my favorite cities in the world.  It’s rainy but rain in Paris just makes it shine.

We are headed to Pere Lachaise. Pere Lachaise map Over 1 million people have been buried here.  Many unknown to most, many very well-known to the French, and some famous around the world.  panoramic, cemetery, Paris, France

Oscar Wilde is buried here.  “A kiss may ruin a human life,” Oscar Wilde once wrote.  His tomb, defaced by women kissing it (no one can quite trace the origin of this tradition – complicated as the man himself) may be the proof that it may ruin it in death as well.  Now it is surrounded by plexiglass, a plea in writing to respect his grave, and a fence around it just in case someone disregards it.    Pere Lachaise, Paris, France  Pere Lachaise, Paris, France

Pierre Lachaise, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery, R.I.P.

 

The cemetery has cobblestone streets, trees and pathways where the trees meet in the middle.  Some tombs are in decay.   Others give you a burst of color.     tomb   Pierre Lachaise, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery, R.I.P., tombs, graves

Then there’s Edith Piaf’s tomb, surprisingly sedate and unassuming.  A tourist came up to us and asked us where it was when he had just passed it.

Pere Lachaise        Pierre Lachaise, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery, R.I.P., Edith Piaf

 

And speaking of unassuming there is Pere Lachaise, Jim Morrison, grave, R.I.P., tomb, The Doors, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery Jim Morrison’s (The Doors) grave.  Pierre Lachaise, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery, R.I.P., tombs, graves, Jim Morrison  Pierre Lachaise, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery, R.I.P. tombs, graves, Jim Morrison, The Doors,

People cross the fences to place flowers, photos, notes in all languages, and just to get close to him.  Pierre Lachaise, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery, R.I.P., tombs, graves  Pierre Lachaise, 20th arrondissement, Paris, France, cemetery, R.I.P., tombs, graves, Jim Morrison

Dean did a documentary on the 40th anniversary of his death in Paris in 2011.  Really good documentary even for those that aren’t fans.

The Doors – Not to Touch the Earth – 40th Anniversary Celebrations at Père Lachaise

Pere Lachaise is closing.  It is close to 6:00 pm.  An attendant with a bell rings it incessantly herding people out.  Time to head over to where “our” houseboat will be.  Dean is filming tomorrow so he wants me to know the area where the boat is so I can tell the taxi driver.  Plus, we still need a bridge for the shoot.

It stopped raining but those are pretty dark clouds!  20th arrondissement, Paris, France, rain, cloudy day, clouds

Into the metro we go.  20th arrondissement, metro, Paris subway, subway, Paris, France  And guess where we are going first?  Eiffel Tower, Paris, France, sign

It started to rain again which doesn’t drown its beauty.  Eiffel Tower, Paris, France

Carrousel, Paris, France, Eiffel Tower  There’s a lonely wet carousel as we approach.   Carrousel at the Eiffel Tower

As hard as it is to leave we must go to the boat which turns out to be only across the river.  River Seine, Paris, France, Eiffel Tower, quay, houseboat, bridge

And here she is: Soleil, the houseboat that we will call home for a bit.  houseboat, Soleil, River Seine, Paris, France  houseboat, Soleil, Paris, France, River Seine, Eiffel Tower  I want to see her from the bridge  bridge, train, architecture, River Seine, Paris, France so we go to it. houseboat, Eiffel Tower, France, Paris, quay, River Seine There we find a monument “La France Renaissante” monument, Eiffel Tower, River Seine, Paris, France  La France Renaissante, Eiffel Tower, Paris, France, River Seine

Another few glances at the Eiffel Tower…River Seine, Eiffel Tower, Paris, France  River Seine, Eiffel Tower, Paris, France and off to dinner at an Italian place Pizzeria Fiorentina(I find that Paris has pretty good Italian food.)  Seafood pasta for me.

Seafood pasta, Italian restaurant in Paris, pasta, yummy, comfort food   And then a crepe sucre (just a basic sugar crepe) that reminds me of my mom.  dessert  Though I must admit to tasting a bit of this…ice cream

And now back into the subway metro, Paris, France, subway  Just in case the map isn’t reminder enough of where you are…Eiffel Tower, subway, metro, Paris, France

subway, metro, Paris, France

As the train departs it gives me this view which almost feels like it was pasted there for the tourists but no, it’s the actual thing.   subway, metro, Paris, France

   Going to bed now.  I’m tired.

Categories: 20th arrondissement, Eiffel Tower, France, Paris, Pere Lachaise | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Water Life and Cambodia Ahoy!

I have been dreaming of seeing Angkor Wat and today -when we leave Chau Doc, Vietnam and take a speedboat to Phnom Penh, Cambodia- I will be two days closer to Siem Reap and Angkor Wat.  In between there is much to see and two immigrations to go through.

As we are leaving the hotel we spot a little girl apparently alone, but actually waiting for her dad.  She’s on a bike with her own little rattan “throne” in front.  We all start waving at her and she timidly waves back.  Dad comes out and takes the veil off her face.  She stares at us and is probably wondering what the fuss is all about!  

After the bus drops us off we still have to walk through a market to get to the boat.  We pass by a temple with inscriptions in Vietnamese and Chinese: Chau Phu Temple.  You would think at this point I would be tired of temples and markets but I still find them fascinating, each generating different emotions in me every time.  

Though small, it is a thriving market the one we go through on the way to the pier.  A crate of chicks reminds me of a Spanish children’s song that goes: “Los pollitos dicen, pío, pío, cuando tienen hambre, cuando tienen frío…”  (The little chicks say peep, peep, peep, when they are hungry, when they are cold…)  These must be really hungry ‘cause their pío, pío is loud and strong!  Somehow it saddens me and I look away.       

The lanes are narrow and motorbikes and people coexist in them.  I’m so enthralled by these huge grapes that I don’t realize that a bike narrowly misses me (or I it).       

And yet, on my next photo none of the craziness is reflected.

We go through an alley  and my inner voice goes “water ahoy!” (I know it’s land ahoy but I wasn’t up for arguing with myself.)

Soda anyone?  

And had I not had breakfast, I could of gotten it at the boat that offered a hot meal to all.     

A houseboat floats by and my thoughts float with it.  I wonder how it must be to live like that. 

I have a few minutes to ponder this as our boat gently advances to a fish farm that we are visiting.   But before that, we shall pass and visit a floating wholesale market.   Another boat offers us a burst of color along with its wares (somewhat like a 7/11 on the water).   A good indication we are entering the market.  

Each boat has a long mast that has, instead of a flag, the fruit or vegetable they are selling waving at the top.

Here’s the coconut boat.  

Want to guess what this one sells?

   

We leave the market with another blast of color from a boat.  

A few minutes later we arrive at the fish farm. 

I try to pay attention, I really do, but the smell from the fish paste so commonly used in almost everything here is so overwhelmingly nauseating that all I’m thinking is getting on our new boat that will take us to Cambodia.  Not that I haven’t smelled it before but it was always intermingled with other scents.  Alone, and in mass quantities, it is hard to breathe.

Relief as I take a huge breath upon boarding the boat that will take us to the Vietnam exit border     and the Cambodian immigration.  I had wondered this morning how it must feel to live on the water and I’m getting a taste of it now.

I have learned to be patient and smile my way through every immigration process but the Cambodian immigration control is unique.

A curious local (as usual it is the people that draw my lens).    

After leaving the boat and walking for a bit there is an immigration control like no other.  

I get the usual “Paraguay?” question but with it comes a smile and a look.  And just in case you don’t believe it actually is a border crossing here are some officials to prove it as we head back to the boat.   This is not the plank we take back to our boat… 

  Back on the boat our trip leader entertains us.  

I relax for we still have about two hours till our arrival to Phnom Pehn, Cambodia.       

My stomach growls, my eyes blink open, and I spot land.     

Thaly, our local guide, and our first and only female guide on our journey, welcomes us at the dock.  This is a bustling, metropolitan city.  We check in at the Almond Hotel where we have lunch.     At this stage of the game most have a hankering for familiar tastes so they serve us ice cream for dessert!  We are all like little kids verbalizing our delight with many “yummms and ahhhs”.

Off to the Royal Palace.      

As we cross the gates the sounds of life outside seem to decrease to nothing.  Isolated perhaps by the tall walls that surround it.  What it doesn’t isolate us from is the brutal sun.

The king is in residence, indicated by his flag waving high.  

I know I should be most impressed by the Throne Hall

-that we are asked not to photograph even from the outside looking in.  In fact, today we can’t go inside at all.   But aside from the Baccarat crystal chandeliers that are certainly captivating, it is the Moonlight Pavilion that holds my eye.     

We head towards the Silver Pagoda set of buildings.  The walls are painted with the Khmer version of the classic Indian epic, the Ramayana.  

I sit and contemplate how manmade beauty is framed and enhanced by nature.  

Life outside the walls has not stopped.        

We go back to the hotel to freshen up and go back out for our ride in a remok (the Cambodian version of a tuk-tuk) along the riverside to our restaurant.  We are served Cambodian food which, as in all of Asia it seems, includes curry something.  We taste fish amok (steamed fish with herbs in a banana wrap).  I am not warming up to Cambodian food as much as I have to the rest of Asian food.

Tomorrow we will have a somber morning walking through The Killing Fields.

Categories: Cambodia, Chau Doc, Phnom Penh, Vietnam | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: